Mount Horeb gets “Wisconsin’s first (full-service) Cider Bar”

Posted by on Feb 19, 2019 in News | 0 comments

Mount Horeb gets “Wisconsin’s first (full-service) Cider Bar”

MOUNT HOREB, WISC (EXCERPTS FROM MADISON.COM): Brix Cider is the newest addition to Mount Horeb’s growing downtown. Billed as “Wisconsin’s first Cider Bar” it stakes that claim by serving a full local food menu as well as the cider it produces. Located two blocks south of Mount Horeb’s Main Street and next door to the looming new headquarters of Duluth Trading Company, Brix Cider showcases apples from 18 farms in southern Wisconsin.

The business, housed in a former cheese warehouse, is also highlighting other local food producers and giving those unfamiliar with farming a peek into the state’s changing agricultural industry where small, family dairy farms are vanishing rapidly.

Brix Cider is the creation of Matt and Marie Raboin, who live south of Barneveld on six acres with their two young children, Teddy, 3, and Vera, 1. This is where, in 2014, the couple began planting scores of apple trees. Today, their orchard has over 1,000 trees that are starting to produce 110 varieties of apples. The Raboins say that 85 to 90 percent of the juice for their 11 ciders is made with apples from other growers.

The goal is to produce about 1,000 gallons of cider a year in a production facility next to the tasting room. But about 50 percent of sales at Brix Cider are designed to come from locally sourced food.

It’s one way that the Raboins and scores of other farm-to-table restaurants are trying to help the state’s farm economy transition from that of traditional dairy farming to a diverse network of agribusinesses. After several false starts focusing on other potential locations, the business landed at 119 South Second Street just south of Mount Horeb’s Main Street as part of the Food Emporium project.

Steve Schlecht, executive chairman of Duluth Trading Company, who has invested in several projects in downtown Mount Horeb. Schlecht had purchased the building that had been eyed for the Food Emporium and called the Raboins to offer them the front half of the building for their cider pub.

Read the full Wisconsin State Journal article here.

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